Socrates Quotations

-Know thyself.

-The unexamined life is not worth living.

-If a rich man is proud of his wealth, he should not be praised until it is known how he employs it.

-Remember there is nothing stable in human affairs; therefore, avoid undue elation in prosperity and undue depression in adversity.

-Do not take thought for your persons or your properties, but first and chiefly to care about the greatest improvement of the soul. I tell you that the virtue is not given by money, but that from virtue come money and every other good of man, public as well as private… The difficulty, my friends, is not in avoiding death, but in avoiding unrighteousness; for that runs faster than death.

-By all means marry. If you get a good wife you will become happy, and if you get a bad one you will become a philosopher.

-Let him who would move the world first move himself.

-If all our misfortunes were laid in one common heap whence everyone must take an equal portion, most people would be contented to take their own and depart.

-May the outward and inward man be at one.

-Be of good cheer about death and know this as a truth, that no evil can happen to a good man, either in life or after death.

-Beauty is a short-lived tyranny.

-As to marriage or celibacy, let a man take which course he will, he will be sure to repent.

-Employ your time in improving yourself by other men’s writings, so that you shall gain easily what others have labored hard for.

-The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.

-The hour of departure has arrived, and we go our ways — I to die and you to live. Which is the better, only God knows.

-Bad men live that they may eat and drink, whereas good men eat and drink that they may live.

-An honest man is always a child.

-Envy is the ulcer of the soul.

-The shortest and surest way to live with honour in the world, is to be in reality what we would appear to be; and if we observe, we shall find, that all human virtues increase and strengthen themselves by the practice of them.

-I decided that it was not wisdom that enabled [poets] to write their poetry, but a kind of instinct or inspiration, such as you find in seers and prophets who deliver all their sublime messages without knowing in the least what they mean.

-Having the fewest wants, I am nearest to the gods.

-I am not an Athenian or a Greek, but a citizen of the world.

-Get not your friends by bare compliments, but by giving them sensible tokens of your love.
Socrates