Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Quotations

-The greater part of all mischief in the world arises from the fact that men do not sufficiently understand their own aims.

-Freedom consists not in refusing to recognize anything above us; but in respecting something which is above us; for by respecting it, we raise ourselves to it, and, by our very acknowledgment, prove that we bear within ourselves what is higher, and are worthy to be on a level with it.

-Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius and magic in it.

-What has not burst forth from your own soul will never refresh you.

-Self knowledge is best learned, not by contemplation, but action. Strive to do your duty and you will soon discover of what stuff you are made.

-So divinely is the world organized that every one of us, in our place and time, is in balance with everything else.

-The greatest effect of the spirit is to elicit the spirit.

-One does not always lose if he has to do without.

-Behavior is a mirror in which every one displays his own image.

-One cannot always be a hero, but one can always be a human.

-We are never deceived; we deceive ourselves.

-As soon as you trust yourself you will know how to live.

-To be pleased with one’s limits is a wretched state.

-Enjoy when you can, and endure when you must.

-Passions are vices or virtues to their highest powers.

-The intelligent man finds almost everything ridiculous, the sensible man hardly anything.

-The world is so empty if one thinks only of mountains, rivers and cities; but to know someone here and there who thinks and feels with us, and though distant, is close to us in spirit – this makes the earth for us an inhabited garden.

-Science arose from poetry–when times change the two can meet again on a higher level as friends.

-There is nothing worse than aggressive stupidity.

-A man can stand anything except a succession of ordinary days.

-Science arose from poetry–when times change the two can meet again on a higher level as friends.

-Everything in the world may be endured except continued prosperity.
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe